Caviglia's Cabinet of Curiosities

Apr 18

I can’t tell you how thrilled I was to illustrate this autobiographical piece by my amazingly talented friend John DeVore.
Read The Witches of the Confederacy at Medium.

I can’t tell you how thrilled I was to illustrate this autobiographical piece by my amazingly talented friend John DeVore.

Read The Witches of the Confederacy at Medium.

Apr 17

[video]

[video]

Apr 16

During which Charlie Chaplin has a birthday.
via Society 6

During which Charlie Chaplin has a birthday.

via Society 6

Apr 15

[video]

Apr 12

I added a new mermaid to my Society 6 store.
I’m really happy with how some of the products look for this one - particularly the tote.

I added a new mermaid to my Society 6 store.

I’m really happy with how some of the products look for this one - particularly the tote.

[video]

Apr 07

[video]

Apr 06

Caviglia's Cabinet of Curiosities: Game of Thrones: Being A Princess Is A Rough Gig -

Apr 04

And there’s this:
noyoutellit:

When we received the artwork for our upcoming show, Fear Itself, we were like whoa! Actually it was more like fjd;fdjfds;fjd;dfj;f!!!! The piece is truly wonderful.
Since we can’t seem to do it proper justice with words, we’ll let artist Carolyn Raship explain what prompted the image:

For me, fear is all about dread and it’s mostly internal. Dark and anxiety and stasis and lack of control. The gnawing doubts that keep everyone awake at night. The things that try to crawl their way into one’s peripheral vision when one is exhausted. And mostly, that terrible nightmare of not being able to move or speak. It’s not the actuality of things, but the anticipation, guilt and terror manufactured in the recesses of our brains that defines fear itself.

Gulp. Yes. Luckily, we’ve recruited four brave storytellers who have conquered some very specific fears and emerged (relatively) unscathed. But don’t take our word for it, come listen for yourself. Fear Itself will take place on Wednesday, April 16th. RSVP here. 
You can view more of Carolyn’s work online at Caviglia’s Cabinet of Curiosities, which is definitely something you should do. 

And there’s this:

noyoutellit:

When we received the artwork for our upcoming show, Fear Itself, we were like whoa! Actually it was more like fjd;fdjfds;fjd;dfj;f!!!! The piece is truly wonderful.

Since we can’t seem to do it proper justice with words, we’ll let artist Carolyn Raship explain what prompted the image:

For me, fear is all about dread and it’s mostly internal. Dark and anxiety and stasis and lack of control. The gnawing doubts that keep everyone awake at night. The things that try to crawl their way into one’s peripheral vision when one is exhausted. And mostly, that terrible nightmare of not being able to move or speak. It’s not the actuality of things, but the anticipation, guilt and terror manufactured in the recesses of our brains that defines fear itself.

Gulp. Yes. Luckily, we’ve recruited four brave storytellers who have conquered some very specific fears and emerged (relatively) unscathed. But don’t take our word for it, come listen for yourself. Fear Itself will take place on Wednesday, April 16th. RSVP here

You can view more of Carolyn’s work online at Caviglia’s Cabinet of Curiosities, which is definitely something you should do. 

Apr 03

I just created this image for the “Fear Itself” edition of No, You Tell It

I just created this image for the “Fear Itself” edition of No, You Tell It

Apr 01

[video]

Mar 31

Bette Midler plugs Trav S.D.'s book, No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous in this week’s People Magazine! She says it’s “the best” and she is not wrong.

Bette Midler plugs Trav S.D.'s book, No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous in this week’s People Magazine! She says it’s “the best” and she is not wrong.

Mar 28

12. The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Before you ask, no, I haven’t read The Goldfinch yet, but it’s sitting on my shelf and I’m looking forward to it.
I loved her first novel about murderous classics scholars attending a fictional version of Bennington College. It’s on my list of books that are wonderful, top notch mysteries that are never characterized as such.
12/40 in my Literary Lent Series

12. The Secret History by Donna Tartt

Before you ask, no, I haven’t read The Goldfinch yet, but it’s sitting on my shelf and I’m looking forward to it.

I loved her first novel about murderous classics scholars attending a fictional version of Bennington College. It’s on my list of books that are wonderful, top notch mysteries that are never characterized as such.

12/40 in my Literary Lent Series

Mar 27

Look. I know I’m very, very behind. But I’m going to get back on track (i.e. desperately catch up on) with my Lent Project. If it kills me.
11. Ali and Nino: A Love Story by Kurban Said (AKA Essad Bey, AKA Lev Nussimbaum, etc.).
A really beautiful novel about a Muslim boy and a Christian girl who fall in love in the last days of Imperial Russia in Baku. The book first came to my attention when I read the extraordinary biography of the author, The Orientalist by Tom Reiss. Kurban Said was actually born Lev Nussimbaum, a Russian Jew, the son of a wealthy oil man in Azerbaijan. His mother was a suicide (and possibly a spy for Stalin, who also - perhaps - occupied the Nussimbaum’s house after the Revolution). He attended high school with the Nabokovs in Germany, converted to Islam (pretending to be a Persian prince). And wrote and wrote and wrote under various pseudonyms and identities.
Ali and Nino was first published in Vienna, in German, in 1937 under the name E.P. Tal Verlag, a pseudonym for a German Countess whose family still claims she is the author (really. you can’t make this stuff up.). Most people, however, believe that Said/Bey/Nussimbaum is the author, as it’s impossible to believe it was written by somebody who hasn’t spent substantial time in Baku. Bey fled to Italy when the Germans occupied Austria and died there in 1942 at the age of 37.
11/40 in my Literary Lent Series

Look. I know I’m very, very behind. But I’m going to get back on track (i.e. desperately catch up on) with my Lent Project. If it kills me.

11. Ali and Nino: A Love Story by Kurban Said (AKA Essad Bey, AKA Lev Nussimbaum, etc.).

A really beautiful novel about a Muslim boy and a Christian girl who fall in love in the last days of Imperial Russia in Baku. The book first came to my attention when I read the extraordinary biography of the author, The Orientalist by Tom Reiss. Kurban Said was actually born Lev Nussimbaum, a Russian Jew, the son of a wealthy oil man in Azerbaijan. His mother was a suicide (and possibly a spy for Stalin, who also - perhaps - occupied the Nussimbaum’s house after the Revolution). He attended high school with the Nabokovs in Germany, converted to Islam (pretending to be a Persian prince). And wrote and wrote and wrote under various pseudonyms and identities.

Ali and Nino was first published in Vienna, in German, in 1937 under the name E.P. Tal Verlag, a pseudonym for a German Countess whose family still claims she is the author (really. you can’t make this stuff up.). Most people, however, believe that Said/Bey/Nussimbaum is the author, as it’s impossible to believe it was written by somebody who hasn’t spent substantial time in Baku. Bey fled to Italy when the Germans occupied Austria and died there in 1942 at the age of 37.

11/40 in my Literary Lent Series